9 technology terms gone to recycle bin | Mana Blog... for all
Jul 31, 2013

Remember the dial-up days and the screeching tone that announced you have just about managed to enter the internet? Well, in a world that's hooked to the net 24x7, dial-up is just one of those terms that sounded geek a decade ago, but are now obsolete. Here we list a few:

Mailer Daemon: Mailer Daemon is the address used by most email providers to inform you regarding a bounced mail. However, over the years, almost everyone has forgotten the address and relate more to mail delivery system.

Dot com: Once upon a time, dot com used to be the sole extension for a domain name. Then came the dot orgs. Today, we have more than 15 options to choose, ranging from .in, .co.in, .name to .biz and .xxx.

Emoticons: When was the last time you told someone that you sent an emoticon? They are called smileys now. And boy, just how many versions of smileys do we need?

Dial: Now that landline phones with rotary dials are almost extinct, you no longer dial a phone. Instead, you type or tap a phone number to start a voice call.

ASL: A commonly used acronym to ask someone about their age, sex and location. It was a rage till the time chatrooms were a rage. With most public chatrooms shutting down, the use of ASL has seen a steep decline in recent years.

EMS: EMS or enhanced messaging service allowed a mobile phone user to send an SMS with bold or italic font, animation or sound effects. It has been made obsolete by MMS and messenger apps.

WWW: Used to denote 'World Wide Web', www is now almost out of advertisements and dayto-day usage. In the feature-rich browsers of today, a user just needs to enter the website name. So, bye bye http, the double slash, even the Triple 'W'.

Plug-and-Play: Used to identify computer hardware that does not require any drivers or software to be installed. As almost all devices are now plug and play, the term is hardly used anymore.

Online search: No one searches anything on the internet any more. You just Google it. Like they 'Xerox' it in the real world.

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